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Boyle to apply for watershed council membership

The Village of Boyle's council approved a motion to apply for membership in the Athabasca Watershed Council at their council meeting held April 3. The motion made by Coun. Barbara Smith was unanimously approved by all councillors present.

The Village of Boyle's council approved a motion to apply for membership in the Athabasca Watershed Council at their council meeting held April 3.

The motion made by Coun. Barbara Smith was unanimously approved by all councillors present.

Chief administrative officer Charlie Ashbey recalled being one of the original members of the board when the council was first founded.

"I, of course, had to step down when I became CAO," Ashbey said. "But there is no harm in us joining, as there is no mandatory fees to be a member."

He added that as they are a part of the Athabasca watershed area, it would be a good idea to join. Ashbey said it will allow them to attend meetings and take an active part in making decisions.

A brochure from the council said their mission is to demonstrate leadership and facilitate informed decision making in the watershed area by bringing stakeholders and Indigenous peoples together to promote and plan a healthy watershed.

Nurse recruiting assistance

The Village of Boyle is trying to do its part to make moving to the community easier for nurses.

In an update to council, Ashbey said he has spoken with three property owners who have furnished suites.

"If a new nurse who moves into a community is looking for somewhere to stay, I will just let them know that we do have accommodations available," he said.

He added that most of the people who had previously rented to pipeline workers found that it helped to have the place furnished.

"You'd be surprised how many furnished accommodations are around," Ashbey said. "They also understand that the prospective nurse might not occupy the property continuously, but they said having somebody in there is better than having the place empty."

Boyle RCMP visits council

Motor vehicle theft is still an issue in the area, according to Boyle RCMP detachment commander Sgt. Steve Genereaux — and a big part of the problem is keys left in cars.

Speaking to Boyle council at their meeting along with Const. Andrew Deme, Genereaux said the police have a few initiatives they are planning to try — like going out three times a year to check the doors on any parked car in the community.

"Outside of the Ford F-250s and the F-350s, 99 per cent of the thefts are due to keys being left in the car," he said. "If the doors are unlocked, we will leave a message warning the owner that not locking the door is exactly how cars are stolen."

During the presentation, Genereaux said he would also like to continue community engagement.

"I am very big on the guys' sit down and eat at the restaurants, so the public and see and talk to them," he said. "Being in the schools are very important to me, as we need to continue to put ourselves out there."

He also said he plans to step up patrols in the rural areas.

"Our main focus will be the reduction of property crimes," Genereux said. "We also plan to continue our curfew check system, where we make sure habitual offenders are in their residence from 10 p.m. until 6 a.m. the next morning."

Genereaux added that the detachment has been making really good connections with support units, citing a drug bust March 22 where $22,000 worth of methamphetamine was taken off the streets.



Bryan Taylor

About the Author: Bryan Taylor

Bryan Taylor is a reporter with the Athabasca Advocate, joining the paper in April 2018. He covers Athabasca and Boyle municipal politics, as well as other news, community events and sports in and around the region.
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